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Radical Mycology Featured on Unlearn & Rewild

Radical Mycology cofounder Peter McCoy was recently featured on the wonderful podcast Unlearn & Rewild with Ayana Young. This rare voice in the wilderness of the internet begins with the premise that “humanity’s primary challenges are to unlearn our destructive conditioning and repair and reintegrate into the wild web of life.” In this interview, Peter shares some of the more politically and ethically charged perspectives that fuel his work with Radical Mycology. Topics covered include how the work of radical mycologists can support social and environmental organizing efforts, the harsh realities of mycoremediation, integration of fungi into permaculture design, and more. Listen to the interview by clicking here.

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Radical Mycology Recently Featured in Grist

Radical Mycology cofounders Maya Elson and Peter McCoy were recently featured in the environmental news and commentary magazine Grist. This excellent article touches on Radical Mycology’s history and various hyphal projects as well as the importance of this work in the context of today’s world. This awesome piece was written by Sara Bernard. Check it out here.

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2014 Radical Mycology Convergence Reportback

RMC 2014 BannerBy Peter McCoy

The Radical Mycology Convergence (RMC) is a volunteer-run gathering that shares the knowledge and skills of working with fungi for personal, societal, and ecological health. A non-discriminatory and family-friendly event, the RMC welcomes people of all backgrounds to learn about and join the growing fields of sustainable mycology and bioremediation. The RMC teaches the means to work with fungi as a resilient food and medicine source as  well a natural ally in efforts to help regenerate, remediate, and renew damaged environments. Emphasizing techniques that are low-cost, the skills and ethos presented at the RMC aim to support a wide range of grassroots efforts advocating for environmental protection, social justice, and local food autonomy.

In the fall of 2014, over 250 people from around the globe gathered at the 3rd Radical Mycology Convergence in Orangeville, IL to gain skills for working with fungi as personal, societal, and ecological medicine. Hosted on the private homestead of bioremediation expert Nance Klehm, the 2014 RMC built on the knowledge base laid at the previous 2 Convergences to further strengthen the emerging fields of community-scale mushroom cultivation and grassroots bioremediation. Hosting over 50 discussions and workshops and 8 edible and experimental remediation installations, this year’s RMC provided new insights into how fungi can help address the increasingly complex challenges of today’s world.

Film by Steve Zieverink

Fertile Substrate

Set up for the RMC began at Fertile Substrate, a 3-day pre-Convergence educational work party where volunteers and organizers prepared piles of substrates, germinated installation inoculum, cleared and designated installation sites, built seating and other infrastructure, and cultured several locally harvested mushroom species such as Elm Oyster (Hypsizygus ulmarius), Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor), Enoki (Flammulina velutipes), Chicken-Of-The-Woods (Laetiporus sulphureus), and Maitake (Grifola frondosa).

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Sourcing and preparing substrates

The Workshops

This year’s RMC hosted over 50 original workshops and discussions focused on one of the several major themes of the RMC: Fungal Biology & Ecology, Ethnomycology, Ecological Restoration & Remediation, and Fungal Cultivation. Many of the workshops intentionally covered topics and skills not typically addressed at mycological events such as using mushroom identification skills to help protect threatened habitats, cultivating mushrooms in arid and extreme environments/climates, the realities of running of a small mushroom farm, and teaching mycology to kids. Friday night’s campfire hosted a challenging discussion addressing the idea “dark ecology,” a theory proposed by author Timothy Morton that the pollution and destructive practices of modern living must be fully embraced in order to overcome them and move toward healthier lives and a healthier world. Also unique to the 2014 RMC teaching model was an expressed desire to increase the presence of women and trans mycologists at the Convergence. As a part of this effort, a discussion directly addressing the role and experience of women and trans people in mycological circles was held at the RMC. A summary of this conversation can be read here.

Descriptions of all the 2014 RMC workshops can be viewed here. Videos of the 2014 RMC’s workshops will be made available online for free in the coming months. To see those when they become available, you can subscribe to our YouTube channel here.

10731602_456662414471436_667240384_nNance Klehm on compost

The Installations

Along with the cultivation workshops and theoretical discussions of the RMC another major component of the Convergence focused on putting theory to practice by facilitating hands-on remediative and regenerative fungal installations during the event. This year’s RMC brought about several novel approaches to working with fungi in landscape to mitigate pollution and renew disturbed habitats.

Determining the sites for remediation work to take place at the RMC was a months-long planning process. Several RMC organizers worked to identify needs, giving preference to issues related to chemical remediation strategies and strengthening local soil and aquatic ecologies. Zones of concern were selected on the property and collaborative planning discussions were held to develop the most effective strategies for addressing these areas. The main issues identified and addressed included the following:

Brush Creek MycoFiltration – Water samples from the property’s creek (Brush Creek) were sent to a local water testing lab prior to the RMC. The water was tested for a range of common chemical and biological contaminants and found to (thankfully) not contain concerning levels of pollutants. However, another concern to the water’s quality had previously been identified: in the rainy spring months heavy rain causes the water table of Brush Creek to rise significantly leading to topsoil erosion and a significant depositing of silt and debris into the creek water. This murky water subsequently reduces available oxygen, choking out aquatic life and reducing the resilience and diversity of riparian communities downstream. To mitigate this issue  a series of filters of mushroom mycelium were installed in the creek (in the form of burlap sacks filled with oak wood chips inoculated with Stropharia rugosoannulata [aka SRA]) to capture silt and increase water purity. The upper portion of the property’s creek was scouted to identify sites that had access to shallow, slower moving sections of the water course where mycelium containers could be installed and easily observed, maintained, and replaced as needed. Two sites were identified.

10732014_578650438928530_1109288106_nPreparing bags of Stropharia rugosoannulata bulk spawn for MycoFiltration of silt

Site A was a preexisting natural dam built of fallen logs and branches. This area was an easy candidate for installation as it would readily retain the bags to be installed. In the coming months the landowner will observe the bags’ health and determine whether they are getting “plugged” with debris, at which point they will need to be replaced.

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Site A of Brush Creek’s MycoFiltration installation

Site B was an overflow side channel in the water’s course that is contained in a short, shallow trench. This shady area is above the water table for most of the year, only filling with water in the rainy season. A series of SRA bags were installed in this channel and secured with branches and stakes of various sizes. In the coming months the bags and surrounding soil will become infused with this mushroom’s mycelium creating a productive mushroom bed. When the water raises next year, overflow from the creek will pass through this mushroom bed, filtering silt and debris as the mycelium is being hydrated (ultimately helping the bed produce more mushrooms). Another function of this mushroom bed is that it will serve to digest much of the property’s Reed Canary Grass. The landowner can simply throw this plant into Site B’s trench, feeding this edible mushroom to increase production while mitigating a common weed.

10724691_864015363622783_1053642658_nSite B of Brush Creek’s MycoFiltration installation

Post-Ag Field Regeneration – The land that hosted to 2014 RMC was a 20 acre parcel that had been heavily cultivated for 70 years with GM corn. While some portions of the property had been left to return to a prairie for 20 years, much of the property had only been out of production for 4 years. Due to years of heavy tillage and chemical input, the diversity in the soil communities of these areas were significantly depressed. These “post-ag” portions of the property were covered in a small number of dominant weeds, a sign of poor soil quality. Our goal was to begin repopulating the soil in these areas by inoculating test plots with beneficial microbes and fungi, thereby kickstarting the natural soil web cycles and eventually leading to greater soil health and increased nutrient availability.

Eight 2’x6′ plots were cleared and inoculated with various combinations of mycorrhizal fungi, compost tea, and biochar. The biochar was produced on-site and inoculated with fresh compost tea that followed standard and biodynamic compost tea practices. Compost tea breeds large quantities of beneficial aerobic microbes. The biochar performs several remediative functions while also serving as a “microbe hotel” where mycorrhizal fungi and other microbes can live. One bed was cleared but not inoculated to serve as a control.

10729295_385536021614627_1867443672_nInoculating biochar with actively aerated compost tea

On the myco end of this installation, several plots were inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi that will help support the soil’s health in numerous ways. The ideal practice for this portion of the experiment would have been to harvest locally-adapted mycorrhizal spores from on-site and culture them in association with plants over a season to amplify their spore load for inoculation. As this would have needed to been done a year in advance, we settled on using a commercial product containing various ecto and endomycorrhizal species. All plots were seeded with a commercial cover crop blend.

Prior to treatment the plots hosted various combinations of the following species (spontaneous vegetation):

Annual and perennial herbaceous plants:
    Dandelion
    Creeping charlie
    Wild aster
    Native aster *
    Stiff goldenrod *
    Canadian goldenrod
    Multiflora rose
    Wild bergamot *
    Reed canary grass
    Brome grass
Woody species:
   Box elder *
   Red maple *
   Red oak *
   White oak *
   Black walnut *
   Wild cherry *
 (* Indicates native species)

In the coming years, the landowner will observe the plots to determine which regenerates the most effectively to host a larger variety of plant species. It is our hypothesis that the plot inoculated with biochar, compost tea, and mycorrhizae will perform the best. Time will tell.

Automobile Engine Point Source Remediation – Not all means of integrating fungi for pollution mitigation need to be complicated or large-scale. For example, a simple “point-source” remediation installation initiated at the RMC involved placing a Pearl Oyster (Pleurotus ostreatus) woodchip bed below the landowner’s parking site. As the mycelium of this well-known remediative species myceliates the wood-based substrate in the coming months, it will also likely absorb and digest the oil and chemicals dripping off the car’s engine. This simple method of treating a common source of household pollution can be effectively installed in driveways around the world as this species and its relatives are quite common in most continents. Mushrooms that fruit from this bed should not be eaten however as they may harbor toxic elements.

914426_851927648180799_833609715_nPoint-source remediation of automobile contaminants

Human Waste Disposal – The human “waste” stream produced over the course of the RMC was treated as a valuable resource. Several composting toilets (The Shiitakers) were installed around the property and the fecal and urine matter collected at these sites was placed in The Pilobolus Pile, a slow compost pile that will eventually turn this common “waste” stream into healthy compost. This pile was constructed with an abundance of sawdust to eliminate smell and the risk of disease.

Beyond the restorative installations, several functional mushroom beds were installed around the property as well:

Hot Compost Garden Giant Bed – The landowner was interested in establishing a simple means for producing edible mushroom spawn that could be installed around the property in the coming years. Our go-to mushroom was easily Garden Giant (Stropharia rugosoannulata aka SRA) as this species is easy to grow on a wide range of substrates. In the property’s hoophouse, two 4′ tall hot compost piles were built with wheat straw and cow manure. On top of these compost materials a perforated cardboard buffer was laid in a circular shape and a woodchip / SRA sawdust spawn sandwich was installed. In the coming months this mushroom bed will myceliate the woodchips up top and eventually travel into the cardboard below. Simultaneously, the compost will heat up and reach an internal temperature of around 140ºF for 6-8 weeks, effectively warming the SRA bed and extending the growing season as the mycelium establishes prior to the coming cold months of winter. As the compost eventually begins to cool, the SRA will migrate from the top layer of woodchips into the compost pile (SRA is a secondary decomposer that prefers partially digested substrates). The compost will ultimately become infused with this incredible garden mushroom’s mycelium. When the compost is laid around the land next spring, this companion mushroom will follow in tow to build top soil, channel nutrients and water in the environment, and support plant health as it establishes across the local landscape.
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Stacking functions: King Stropharia mushroom bed on a hot compost pile

Stacking the Funk-tions: Elm Oysters on Reed Canary Grass – Two things were abundant on the property that piqued our cultivation function stacking interests. The edible and remediative Elm Oyster (Hypsizygus ulmarius) mushroom was found growing prodigiously on the property as was the common weed known as Reed Canary Grass (RCG), which we found dominating the old pasture on site. We decided to make use of the RCG (seeing it as an abundant local substrate) by inoculating it with the Elm Oyster, a vigorous species known for its ability to consume a wide variety of substrates. We harvested a basket of these local mushrooms and collected their spores to make a simple “spore slurry” inoculum. Simultaneously, the RCG was harvested and prepared for inoculation by means of fermentation. Once the grass was prepared, the spore slurry was applied by packing the straw in plastic containers and pouring the spore slurry evenly throughout the packing process. In the coming weeks, the mushroom spores will germinate and fuse, forming numerous distinct genetic strains that will develop into diverse mycelial networks to digest the RCG. As these numerous strains grow out, some will stand out in the vigor and tenacity. The strains that fruit most heavily can then be isolated by the landowner. Repeating this spore slurry process with these superior strains in subsequent trials will essentially “speed up evolution” leading to the development of a “super-strain” of the Elm Oyster that will fruit exceptionally well on this locally abundant substrate.

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10706632_1550678755146234_1708386854_n          Hypsizygus ulmarius spore prints                  Preparing Reed Canary Grass for fermentation

The Oak Leaf – A simple, symbolic King Stropharia mushroom bed was installed in a depression in the land downhill from a culvert. Designed in the shape of an oak leaf, this bed was created to honor the dominant tree species on the land and to reflect the value of this wood type in mushroom cultivation. (The density and richness of oak has long been noted to be a superior wood for cultivation of several species such as Shiitake).

10723758_964375643576428_236557124_nHypsizygus ulmarius was found in abundance on the property

Spawning Mycelial Networks

While workshops and installations are the central feature of the Radical Mycology Convergences, there is another, perhaps even more important theme that runs throughout the weekend as well: community building. Knowing the difficulty that can come with studying mycology and mushroom cultivation, the RMC organizers worked intentionally throughout the weekend to help encourage the development of friendships and alliances amongst attendees that will extend beyond the 5 days of the gathering. By camping, cooking, eating, learning, and engaging in discussions together, participants were readily able to meet future cohorts and know that others shared their excitement (and confusion) around working with the fungal kingdom.

On the Sunday of the RMC, a break out discussion was held where participants gathered by region to brainstorm how the skills they learned at the RMC could be applied in their communities. By the end of the discussions, several new Radical Mycology groups had formed to take the skills of grassroots mycology back to their home towns and bioregions. Spawning mycelial networks of collaboration amongst attendees, the 3rd Radical Mycology Convergence has helped increase awareness around the fact that anyone can grow mushrooms for food, medicine, and the benefit of environmental resilience. And there is no better time to join this movement than now.


Thank you!

A big thank you goes out to everyone who presented, supported, sponsored, volunteered, threw down, or otherwise helped co-create this year’s Radical Mycology Convergence. This year’s RMC would not have been such a success without all of your input and collaboration. Thank you to Shawndra Miller for writing up two great reviews of the RMC (here and here) and to Jessie Robertson for his write up here.

See you all at the next RMC!

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Mush love getting served up in the Kit-Chanterelle               Sunday night’s barn dance

Radical Mycology featured on Permaculture Voices

Radical Mycology member Peter McCoy was recently featured on Permaculture Voices, a podcast that highlights voices in the global permaculture community. In this interview, Peter goes deep into the reasons why anyone with the means and spare time should be actively cultivating fungi and how the world of mycology is currently evolving to match the needs of an increasingly complex world. You can hear the interview by clicking the image below and consider donating to Permaculture Voices to support their great work.

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Radical Mycology recently interviewed on WTUL

Peter and Willoughby of the Radical Mycology crew were recently interviewed on WTUL in New Orleans to talk about fungi and the 2014 Radical Mycology Tour. Check out the interview here.

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Montreal x Remediation x Radical Mycology

Geoffroy

Geoffroy Renaud-Grignon, founder of Champignons Maison and Mycélium Rémedium in Montreal, was recently featured in a great radio-essay by Alexandre Touchette, called Cultiver des Champignons en Ville. In the 15 minute piece, Geoffroy talks about his small business that produces spawn and oyster kits on salvaged coffee grounds as well as his work in mycoremediation of post-industrial sites with the goal of creating green spaces for urban gardening. Geoffroy will serve as translator for the upcoming Radical Mycology workshops to be held in Montreal, on September 18, as a part of the Radical Mycology tour.

Radical Mycology Featured in New Documentary

Peter McCoy of Radical Mycology was recently featured in a short documentary on the current rise in mycological culture in the west. As it happens, this film, just like the Radical Mycology Book, was also funded by a crowdfunding campaign. Oh, what a wonderful mycelial internet(work).

 

For more on the film maker, Madison McClintock, check out her website here.

Radical Mycology featured on The Survival Podcast

Peter McCoy of the Radical Mycology project was recently interviewed on The Survival Podcast with Jack Spirko. Topics ranged from Radical Mycology, medicinal mushrooms, and a cultivation overview for survival strategies. Click the image below to hear the interview.

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Announcing the 2014 Radical Mycology Convergence!

Date: October 9-13, 2014 (Th-M)
Location: Orangeville, IL (Address given upon registration)
Suggested Donation: $50-300 (No one turned away for lack of funds)

www.radicalmycologyconvergence.com

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What:
The Radical Mycology Convergence (RMC) is a volunteer-run gathering of mycologists, fungal enthusiasts, activists, and Earth stewards that focuses on teaching the numerous ways that fungi can strengthen the personal, social, and ecological systems of the world. The RMC covers the skills related to working with fungi to create perpetual food systems, grow potent medicines, restore damaged and polluted environments, and organize regenerative and resilient communities. The RMC is a 5-day donation-based event that provides a unique opportunity to build community with like-minded social and environmental justice workers from around the world.

Why:
We (the organizers of the RMC) want to make information on fungi and their transformative potential as accessible and tangible as possible without making it overly technical, as has historically been the case. By creating a supportive environment at the RMC, we hope to educate all who attend on the value that fungi play in our lives while helping to create a more mushroom-literate culture that can learn to see working with the fungi as an important tool for addressing some of the world’s most pressing issues. To learn more about the ethos behind this event, visit the link below:
bit.ly/whatisrm

Where:
The 2014 RMC will be located on a partially wheelchair accessible rural homestead. There will be infrastructure (food, water, bathrooms, and camping space) to accommodate the 400 attendees. For those unable to visit the Orangeville center of the RMC, there will also be an urban component to this year’s RMC based in Madison, WI. Details on the urban component TBA. To learn more about the site of the site and what to expect when you arrive click the link below:
http://bit.ly/rmcsite

How:
The RMC is made possible by the effort of a small group of organizers, monetary and supply donations, and the countless volunteers that collaborate at the RMC in manifesting a culture that values community cooperation and biocentric paradigms. The RMC is not corporate sponsored and all proceeds from donations go to covering presenter travel costs, logistical costs, and funding future RMCs. We have increased the suggested donation for this year’s RMC to better reflect the value of the event, the amount of money it costs to run such a large and complex event, and to encourage more volunteer collaboration before, during, and after the RMC.

Who:
The organizers of the RMC would like to cordially invite anyone interested in participating in this non-discriminatory and family friendly event to come and learn, help out, or teach! However, there is a 400 participant limit to registered attendance. Registration spaces are offered on a first come, first reserved basis.

To register for the RMC, visit the link below:
http://bit.ly/rmcregpage

Callout for Workshop Leaders, Volunteers, & Donations
We will be relying heavily on volunteer helpers and workshop leaders to help make the RMC reach it’s full potential. Linked below are sign-up forms on the RMC website for folks interested in actively contributing to this event.

To see our workshop wishlist and to sign up to lead a workshop, please click the link below:
bit.ly/rmcworkshops

To sign up to volunteer before, during, or after the RMC, please click the link below:
bit.ly/rmchelp

We are in need of donations in the form of food, equipment, spawn, and infrastructural materials. These donations can be made tax-deductible as the RMC is sponsored in part by the 501(c)3 non-profit Corenewal. If you think you might be able to donate or loan items to help make this event a success, please visit our donation wishlist here:
bit.ly/rmcdonations

Womyn & Fungi
When the RMC started in 2011, there were female organizers but largely male teachers. In 2012 we were all pleased to see an influx in female presenters at the RMC. This year we are actively seeking female and trans presenters, organizers, and attendees and are continuing to make a conscious effort to recognize the contributions women and trans folk have made to the science of mycology.

Fertile Substrate: A Pre-RMC Course
To ensure that the land hosting the RMC is well prepared for the Convergence, we will be hosting a work party and workshop short course on-site the weekend prior to the RMC (Oct. 3-5). For more information on that pre-course and how to register, click the link below:
http://bit.ly/prermcfs

Help Promote the RMC
While the RMC flyer is in production and nat yet available for distribution, we can use your help in spreading the word about the RMC by forwarding this email and visiting the social media links below:

Join the RMC Facebook event:
bit.ly/2014rmc

RMC Fundraising Toolkit
For folks on a tight budget, we have put together a small fundraising toolkit to help individuals and groups cover their travel and donation costs for the RMC. Check out this resource here:
http://bit.ly/rmcfunds

Featured Fungi of the 2014 RMC: Laccaria spp.
The featured fungi of the 2014 RMC is the genus Laccaria. To learn more about this incredible genus and why we chose to highlight it, click the link below:
http://bit.ly/rmcfungi

For any futher information or for questions please visit www.radicalmycologyconvergence.com or contact us at radicalmycologyconvergence@gmail.com

Radical Mycology featured on The Visionary Activist Show

Peter McCoy of the Radical Mycology project was recently interviewed on The Visionary Activist Show with Caroline Casey. Topics ranged from psychedelics, to panspermia, to remediation, to symbiosis. Check out the interview here.

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