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Radical Mycology Mixtape Video Now Streaming

Portland-based visual artist Ross Barmache offers up a nearly hour-long music video to accompany last December’s release of the Radical Mycology Mixtape (Vol. 1). Complimenting the various genres and moods found throughout the album, Barmache pulls together hundreds of obscure fungi-based clips from the last century to overlay each track with hand-picked visuals merged, color washed, and down sampled to their mycelial core. The effect is a way of seeing fungi that is familiar, yet novel – engaged, and hypnotic. Dig it.

To stream the album or to pickup a copy of the limited edition cassette tape, check out the Radical Mycology Bandcamp.

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Radical Mycology Release Party and Livestream

FB EVENT BANNER

After months in the making, the first Radical Mycology Mixtape is dropping December 19! Celebrate with us in Portland, or via livestreaming on Facebook or Instagram.

This event will also be a fundraiser for MYCOLOGOS, a mycology school forming in Portland, which is running a Kickstarter campaign that ends Dec. 20.

Prize giveaways (in-person and through the livestream) of mycology courses, Radical Mycology books, and art!

Performances By:

Screening of music videos and narratives from the mixtape:

  • Two mushooms KNOCKING (Australia)
  • See Through Machine (Providence, RI)
  • The Curse of the Wild Morels (Ontario, Canada)
  • How Doth the CrocodileDJing by Northern Draw
    VJing by Ross Barmache

The event will take place at The Know (3728 NE Sandy Blvd, Portland, OR 97232). See the Facebook event page here.

Photo by Madeline Cass.


Mushroom Cultivation Courses and Soil Fungi Master Class

Starting this July, Peter McCoy will be hitting the road to leading several 20-hour Mushroom Cultivation & Application Courses across the U.S. Peter has been teaching about mushroom cultivation for over 10 years and as each year passes, this Course only gets more robust, thorough, and immersive.

If you’ve been thinking of getting into mushroom growing, or of taking your practice in the art to the next level, this Course will leave you well equipped to advance and evolve your work with fungi for years to come. Confirmed locations and dates are listed below, each with more information on what to expect.

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Soil Fungi Master Class

This August, Peter will also be joined by soil, compost, and bioremediation expert Nance Klehm in Chicago, Illinois for an unprecedented 7-day Master Class on the many functions of fungi in soil systems. Offering a skillset found nowhere else in the world, this Course will provide any food, fungi, and Earth lover with insights and practices for managing landscapes and designing holistic environments through the often overlooked lens of these hidden fungi. Starting with the ecology and forms of soil fungi, this Master Class will take participants through all the skills needed to identify, assess, isolate, cultivate, and apply many types of soil fungi in any habitat, both disturbed and intact. For more information, click the image below.


La Sémiosphères du Radical Mycology

This month, Peter McCoy and Radical Mycology are being featured in an international art-ecology exhibition at Le Commun in Geneva, Switzerland as a part of a month-long exhibition series entitled La Sémiosphère du Commun.

Over the course of three weeks, Peter held several workshops and presentations on his unique approach to working with and teaching about fungi and also worked in collaboration with filmmaker Marion Neumann and artist collaboratory Utopiana founder Anna Barseghian to design several installation components that were inspired by ideas presented in Peter’s book. Though the project just opened the other day, it has already some great local press in a few places so far. For all the details, check the video and images below and see the event’s full description at the bottom.

          Le commun mushroom bricks on coffee grounds

The impetus behind the whole exhibition series was to remediate the wooden bricks that make up the floor of the gallery. After denial from the government (which owns the building), the idea spawned into a larger series of questions about how to engage with fungi and other organisms to not just heal the environment, but learn from and recognize our relationship to it.

radical mycology mushroom switzerland lab installation The five main components were a mini-mushroom lab where liquid inoculum (culture) and spawn are produced, a mock oil spill, mycorediation of household waste, mycorediation of used cigarette filters, mycorediation of “bricks,” and a fruiting environment for mushroom growing. Click on the image for the full resolution panorama.

grain-spawn-installation

In the mushroom lab, grains were inoculated on three separate dates, each 3 days apart, to demonstrate how quickly mushroom mycelium grows.

mushrooms-growing-on-cigarettesFollowing up on Peter’s novel approach to growing mushrooms on cigarette filters to degrade the chemicals they contain, part of the workshop series taught participants how to repeat the methodology Peter developed at home.

cigarette-mycoremediation

Dozens of small vials were made. motor-oil-mycoremediation

Oil-soaked cardboard mixed with used coffee grounds, and mushroom mycelium. Over the coming weeks, the mycelium will digest the chemicals into simpler and (likely) less-toxic byproducts.

oil-spill-mycoremediationMimicking an oil spill, used motor oil was mixed with soil to then be remedaited by a mushrooms (the Pearl Oyster [Pleurotus ostreatus]). Pasteurized straw and mushroom mycelium were added and the timer set to see how long it would take for the mushroom to take over the substrate.moss-theramin

There were a ton of other amazing projects and exhibits as a part of the exhibition. Here, an open-source theramin is hooked up to pads of moss from various polluted sites, with their differing conductivity being translated into down sampled frequency generators.ipad-particle-detector

An employee from CERN demonstrated his hand-made emission detector hooked up to an iPad. As electrons, alpha, beta, or gamma particles are detected, the signal is translated into an audio signal with the Korg synthesizer (upper right). bacterial-cultures

Soil and water cultures from a lake in Romania polluted by a nearby aluminum processing facility.

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The project entitled « The Semiosphere of the Commun » emerges from the very space of Le Commun. We learned that in 2006 the Building Services entrusted the engineering-environment-safety company Ecoservices SA to carry out tests for pollutants potentially present at the BAC. In parallel, the STEB (Service de toxicologie de L’environnement bâti du Canton de Genève – the Service of Toxicology Service of the Built Environment, Geneva Canton) measured the quality of air in a number of spaces of the building. The laboratories tested the samples taken from the floors and the false ceilings for presence of heavy metals, PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) and asbestos, and found an important level of hydrocarbon pollution in all surface samples taken from the wooden and screed floors, dating back and inherited from the industrial period of the building. The PAHs were also present and even released in more or less important quantities depending on temperature variations. Heavy metals were occasionally present in excess. The tests showed presence of asbestos in the glue used to fix the wooden floors on the ground floor as well as in the ceiling panels. The detected asbestos is non-porous and does not present a health hazard as long as it remains untouched. In conclusion, Ecoservices SA considers the site to be contaminated, but without danger for medium term occupants.

In its activities Utopiana is interested in questions and alternative methods of decontamination. In 2015 and as an interventionist artistic gesture, we submitted an in situ project to the Geneva authorities, which consisted in the partial decontamination of the floor of Le Commun by a remedial action thanks to mushrooms and phytomining.

We consider this situation to be an opportunity to enlarge the fields of knowledge so as to address more deeply the question of the environment. In fact, we want to conceive differently the very idea of the environment (Umwelt) so that it integrates different theoretical, institutional, and political factors and takes into account various pragmatic engagements.

Other than the knowledge of ecological processes, the solution to these problems also requires understanding of human behaviour because the semiotic aspects of the human-nature relationships that are important in this context and in others are not yet sufficiently understood or considered.

The scaffold that has been erected from the space of Le Commun presents itself as a “relational biosphere” which attempts to weave new frames uniting “two cultures”: the humanities and the arts on the one hand, and the technical and natural sciences on the other. Or, more generally – the union of the cultural fields and those dealing with natural phenomena. In order for us to understand and to act in the current ecological situation, we propose to consider human culture as a sphere of continuous interplay of signs – as a semiosphere, as an open entity which constantly influences and is being influenced – and to underline the importance of the processes of symbiosis at the interior and exterior limits of this semiosphere. Just as much as the biosphere is necessary for the existence of different terrestrial species, the semiosphere precedes the existence of meanings that populate it. Thus, Le Commun interlocks the real, physical space and the social, virtual one.

We must understand the similar dynamics that manifest themselves on all levels of the living (semiosphere, biosphere, Umwelt) in order to understand the rupture that man has created in his environment through the production and accumulations of materials that no longer partake in the recycling of elements of our ecosystem.

The concept of the semiosphere is considered in its relational capacity for a future of the ecology of thought, of subjectivity, of desire, of power, of affect – in short, of modes of existence.


Radical Mycology Book Tour Announced

 

2016 tour

After several months of being out of stock, the book Radical Mycology is now back, this time in its glorious second printing! To celebrate, we are excited to announce the 2016 Radical Mycology Book Tour.

This fall, Peter McCoy is traveling across the U.S. to spread the myco-word about his newly published book, Radical Mycology: A Treatise on Seeing & Working With Fungi. Peter will be stopping in over 40 cities to hold free presentations on the book’s many wide-ranging topics, covering everything from fungal ecology to mushroom cultivation to mycoremediation and much more. Interspersed throughout the tour Peter will also be holding 11 Mushroom Cultivation & Application Courses, freshly updated with the latest research and protocols. To see the exact locations and details of each stop, click on the image above.


Free Mushroom Cultivation & Application Webinar with Peter McCoy

Cultivation Webinar

Next Thursday, April 28th, Peter McCoy of the Radical Mycology Collective will be offering a free webinar on many of groundbreaking skills discussed in Radical Mycology, one of the most comprehensive books on fungi and mushroom cultivation ever written.

WORKING WITH FUNGI FOR GLOBAL RESILIENCE
April 28 at 6PM Pacific (9PM Eastern)

Mycology is proving itself to be a nearly inexhaustible field for innovation. As new discoveries are constantly being made, there seems to be no end to what fungi can offer humans, their communities, and the environments they touch. In this talk, Peter will explore the wide range of ways to cultivate fungi and integrate them into our lives, homes, and landscapes. Along with detailing some of the most appropriate mycotechniques currently being developed, Peter will also unveil unprecedented protocols for accessibly growing edible and medicinal mushrooms as well as new learning opportunities for advancing the future of human-fungal relations.

This unique talk will be live streamed with the ability for viewers to chat with Peter directly and ask him questions from anywhere in the world. There will also be free book giveaways and special discounts offered to all viewers. To register for this paradigm-shifting talk, click here.


Two Free Mycology Webinars With Peter McCoy

RMinars

Next month, Peter McCoy will be offering two free webinars on many of groundbreaking topics discussed in Radical Mycology, one of the most comprehensive books on fungi and mushroom cultivation ever written. These unique talks will be live streamed with the ability for viewers to chat with Peter directly and ask him questions from anywhere in the world. There will also be free book giveaways and special discounts offered to all viewers. To register for this paradigm-shifting talk, click here.

 

SEEING FUNGI
April 14 at 6PM Pacific (9PM Eastern)

Fungi are everywhere around us, creating and maintaining whole ecological webs. For many, learning to recognize these relationships is one of the most incredible and inspiring aspects of working with the fungal kingdom. In this presentation, Peter will walk through the critical ecological roles that fungi fulfill from the poles to the oceans and from the forests to the deserts. Along the way, Peter will detail how fungal ecologies have influenced the development human cultures throughout time, including a wealth of incredible evidence that he has uncovered on the importance of fungi in the origins and evolution of life. Whether you are new to mycology or well versed in the topic, this talk will leave you overwhelmed with fascination for the incredible fifth kingdom!

WORKING WITH FUNGI FOR GLOBAL RESILIENCE
April 28 at 6PM Pacific (9PM Eastern)

Mycology is proving itself to be a nearly inexhaustible field for innovation. As new discoveries are constantly being made, there seems to be no end to what fungi can offer humans, their communities, and the environments they touch. In this talk, Peter will explore the wide range of ways to cultivate fungi and integrate them into our lives, homes, and landscapes. Along with detailing some of the most appropriate mycotechniques currently being developed, Peter will also unveil unprecedented protocols for accessibly growing edible and medicinal mushrooms as well as new learning opportunities for advancing the future of human-fungal relations.


Radical Mycology Featured in New Documentary

Peter McCoy of Radical Mycology was recently featured in a short documentary on the current rise in mycological culture in the west. As it happens, this film, just like the Radical Mycology Book, was also funded by a crowdfunding campaign. Oh, what a wonderful mycelial internet(work).

 

For more on the film maker, Madison McClintock, check out her website here.


Announcing the 2014 Radical Mycology Convergence!

Date: October 9-13, 2014 (Th-M)
Location: Orangeville, IL (Address given upon registration)
Suggested Donation: $50-300 (No one turned away for lack of funds)

www.radicalmycologyconvergence.com

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What:
The Radical Mycology Convergence (RMC) is a volunteer-run gathering of mycologists, fungal enthusiasts, activists, and Earth stewards that focuses on teaching the numerous ways that fungi can strengthen the personal, social, and ecological systems of the world. The RMC covers the skills related to working with fungi to create perpetual food systems, grow potent medicines, restore damaged and polluted environments, and organize regenerative and resilient communities. The RMC is a 5-day donation-based event that provides a unique opportunity to build community with like-minded social and environmental justice workers from around the world.

Why:
We (the organizers of the RMC) want to make information on fungi and their transformative potential as accessible and tangible as possible without making it overly technical, as has historically been the case. By creating a supportive environment at the RMC, we hope to educate all who attend on the value that fungi play in our lives while helping to create a more mushroom-literate culture that can learn to see working with the fungi as an important tool for addressing some of the world’s most pressing issues. To learn more about the ethos behind this event, visit the link below:
bit.ly/whatisrm

Where:
The 2014 RMC will be located on a partially wheelchair accessible rural homestead. There will be infrastructure (food, water, bathrooms, and camping space) to accommodate the 400 attendees. For those unable to visit the Orangeville center of the RMC, there will also be an urban component to this year’s RMC based in Madison, WI. Details on the urban component TBA. To learn more about the site of the site and what to expect when you arrive click the link below:
http://bit.ly/rmcsite

How:
The RMC is made possible by the effort of a small group of organizers, monetary and supply donations, and the countless volunteers that collaborate at the RMC in manifesting a culture that values community cooperation and biocentric paradigms. The RMC is not corporate sponsored and all proceeds from donations go to covering presenter travel costs, logistical costs, and funding future RMCs. We have increased the suggested donation for this year’s RMC to better reflect the value of the event, the amount of money it costs to run such a large and complex event, and to encourage more volunteer collaboration before, during, and after the RMC.

Who:
The organizers of the RMC would like to cordially invite anyone interested in participating in this non-discriminatory and family friendly event to come and learn, help out, or teach! However, there is a 400 participant limit to registered attendance. Registration spaces are offered on a first come, first reserved basis.

To register for the RMC, visit the link below:
http://bit.ly/rmcregpage

Callout for Workshop Leaders, Volunteers, & Donations
We will be relying heavily on volunteer helpers and workshop leaders to help make the RMC reach it’s full potential. Linked below are sign-up forms on the RMC website for folks interested in actively contributing to this event.

To see our workshop wishlist and to sign up to lead a workshop, please click the link below:
bit.ly/rmcworkshops

To sign up to volunteer before, during, or after the RMC, please click the link below:
bit.ly/rmchelp

We are in need of donations in the form of food, equipment, spawn, and infrastructural materials. These donations can be made tax-deductible as the RMC is sponsored in part by the 501(c)3 non-profit Corenewal. If you think you might be able to donate or loan items to help make this event a success, please visit our donation wishlist here:
bit.ly/rmcdonations

Womyn & Fungi
When the RMC started in 2011, there were female organizers but largely male teachers. In 2012 we were all pleased to see an influx in female presenters at the RMC. This year we are actively seeking female and trans presenters, organizers, and attendees and are continuing to make a conscious effort to recognize the contributions women and trans folk have made to the science of mycology.

Fertile Substrate: A Pre-RMC Course
To ensure that the land hosting the RMC is well prepared for the Convergence, we will be hosting a work party and workshop short course on-site the weekend prior to the RMC (Oct. 3-5). For more information on that pre-course and how to register, click the link below:
http://bit.ly/prermcfs

Help Promote the RMC
While the RMC flyer is in production and nat yet available for distribution, we can use your help in spreading the word about the RMC by forwarding this email and visiting the social media links below:

Join the RMC Facebook event:
bit.ly/2014rmc

RMC Fundraising Toolkit
For folks on a tight budget, we have put together a small fundraising toolkit to help individuals and groups cover their travel and donation costs for the RMC. Check out this resource here:
http://bit.ly/rmcfunds

Featured Fungi of the 2014 RMC: Laccaria spp.
The featured fungi of the 2014 RMC is the genus Laccaria. To learn more about this incredible genus and why we chose to highlight it, click the link below:
http://bit.ly/rmcfungi

For any futher information or for questions please visit www.radicalmycologyconvergence.com or contact us at radicalmycologyconvergence@gmail.com


How to Make Medicinal Mushroom Capsules

At $0.50 – $1.00 per pill, commercial medicinal mushroom capsules are prohibitively expensive for most people. This is rather unfortunate as the powerful abilities that these fungi have for increasing immunity, suppressing tumor growth, and healing the body are incredibly beneficial to most people. It is also remarkable when one discovers that the cost of actually producing these capsules can be as low as 5% of their retail cost. That’s a 95% markup!

Thankfully, there are means for one to make their own medicinal mushroom capsules at a fraction of the retail price. Making your own medicinal mushroom capsules is not only cheap and easy, it is also an empowering means to providing your own medicinal mushroom products for increased longevity.

In the short video below, Peter McCoy of the Radical Mycology project demonstrates a simple method of producing a large quantity of medicinal mushroom capsules using a minimum of equipment. In summary, one introduces mushroom mycelium into jars of sterilized brown rice. The mycelium is then allowed to grow on the rice for several weeks, at which point the resultant “myceliated brown rice” is dried and powdered. Myceliated brown rice is the main ingredient in many commercial medicinal mushroom capsules. The main differences between the capsules that Peter makes and the commercial products are as follows:

  1. Some of the higher quality commercial products include powdered whole mushrooms (their fruiting bodies) along with the mycelium. However, as Peter points out in the video, there are some medicinal mushrooms that can be fruited “in the jar,” thereby allowing one to still obtain the benefits of the fruiting bodies.
  2. Commercial products are freeze dried, not air dried. While freeze drying allows for a longer shelf life, it is not easily accomplished for the home medicine maker and herbalist (but cheap methods do exist). Air dried mycelium should be stored in the fridge and occasionally checked for quality.
  3. Some commercial products (but not necessarily all of them) utilize mushroom “strains” that have been tested and shown to contain higher than average quantities in their medicinal constituents. What this means is that the genetics of the mycelium you are working with–and the capsules it ultimately produces–may not contain as high of a concentration of medicinally active constituents as a commercial product would. While this can be true (just as plants can vary widely in their relative medicinal compound concentration), there are some ways to tackle this argument. One simple solution is to simply consume more capsules. Considering that they are quite inexpensive to produce and that there are no documented deaths associated with an overdose of medicinal mushroom capsules, this is an easy work around. Another perspective is the idea that if you are working with a mushroom that was harvested locally, the medicinal compounds that it produces might be of a more beneficial constitution than that of an imported variety. This is a commonly held belief in the world of plant herbalism: that the natural medicine that is most beneficial for a person can often be found in their own region of the world.

Ultimately, the home creation of medicinal mushroom products is a valuable skill for one to learn for self-sufficiency and resilient living strategies and can compete in quality with many expensive commercial products sold today.

This technique for integrating fungi into your everyday life, and many more like it, will be covered to an even greater depth in the Radical Mycology Book. If you would like to learn more mushroom-related skills like this for healing yourself and your community, please visit the Radical Mycology Book Fundraiser.

The cultivation videos referred to in this video can be viewed here.